Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools Cricket Curriculum

This packet is designed to help teachers incorporate cricket into the Physical Education curriculum, while also providing other opportunities for students to play the game, such as in recess or after-school programs.

Packet Resources
K-8 Physical Education Lesson Plans
Recess Lesson Plans
Integration Resources
Cricket Rubric
Vocabulary
North Carolina Teacher Evaluation Information
Skill Videos

North Carolina Healthy Living Essential Standards
K:
MS.1.2
MC.2.2
HF.3.2
HF.3.3
PR.4.1
PR.4.2



1st:
MS.1.2
MC.2.1
MC.2.2
MC.2.3
HF.3.2
HF.3.3
PR.4.1
PR.4.2

2nd:
MS.1.2
MC.2.1
MC.2.2
MC.2.3
HF.3.2
PR.4.1
PR.4.2
PR.4.3

3rd:
MS.1.2
MC.2.1
MC.2.2
MC.2.3
HF.3.2
PR.4.1
PR.4.2
PR.4.3

4th:
MS.1.2
MC.2.1
MC.2.2
MC.2.3
HF.3.3
PR.4.1
PR.4.2
PR.4.3

5th:
MS.1.2
MS.1.3
MC.2.1
MC.2.2
HF.3.2
PR.4.1
PR.4.2
PR.4.3

6th:
MS.1.2
MS.1.3
MC.2.1
MC.2.2
MC.2.3
HF.3.2
PR.1.1
PR.1.2
PR.1.3
7th:
MS.1.2
MC 2.1
MC.2.2
MC.2.3
H.F.3.2
PR.1.1
PR.1.2
PR.1.3

8th:
MS.1.2
MS.1.3
MC.2.1
MS.2.2
MC.2.3
H.F.3.2
H.F.3.2
PR.1.1
PR.1.2


Cricket Lesson Plans

K-2: Cricket Lesson #1
Previously Taught Skills:
Personal Space, Basic Locomotor skills
Equipment:
Yarn or foam ball for every student
Foam bowling pins, wickets, or two cones with Lummi stick across the top
Warm Up: Students find a personal space and a ball and began practicing self toss and catch. Students should focus on using two hands when trying to catch the ball and moving their bodies where the ball is coming down. Monitor students to ensure they are using correct tossing and catching mechanics.
Skill Practice: Students quickly find a partner and a ball, take five steps back and begin working on catching with two hands and tossing a ball underhand. Challenge the students to see if they can make five catches in a row without dropping the ball. If students succeed in catching five catches in a row, allow them to try the overhand throw and catch. Monitor students to ensure they are using correct tossing, throwing and catching mechanics.
Skill Game: Students remain with their partner and roll a ball to a designated wicket and take turns. Depending on the student’s skill level, they can use a bowling roll or a rainbow underhand toss towards the wicket.After several repetitions, the partners turn and now roll the ball towards the two other partners’ wicket for a 4 player game. Only allow one ball in each game for each side to take turns. Allow for several repetitions before adding a flat bat. Move one of those partners to the other side and allow one student to stand with a flat bat. The other three students will take turns to bowl towards the wicket and field the balls. The batsman will get three chances to bat and then rotates to the back of the line.
Check for Understanding:
How is an underhand toss different or alike from an overhand throw?
Identify the skills needed to knock down the other steams pins or wickets.




K-2: Cricket Lesson #2
Previously Taught Skills:
Bowling, Catching, Throwing, Tossing
Equipment:
Low cones
Flat bats
Pins, Wickets, or two Cones with Lummi stick across the top
Whiffle balls or yarn balls depending on skill level
Warm Up: Play the Skill game from Lesson #1. Remind students that they will be playing on the same sides and teams as last week to minimize set-up time.
Stations: Pair students with a partner. Students practice Cricket skills with a partner and then rotate to the next station.
1. Batting: One partner hit a ball off a low cone with a flat bat, while other partner tries to field the batted ball successfully. Allow batter to have three hits and then switch positions.
2. Partner Toss and Catch: Partners start five feet apart and try to toss and catch the ball five times in a row. Every time they make five successful catches in a row, they get to take a step back. If the ball hits the ground, they must return to their original position and start over.
3. Underhand Bowling: One partner is the bowler and one partner is the catcher. The bowler has three Underhand rolls to knock down the pins or wicket before they switch positions.
4. Partner Throw and Catch: Partners start five feet apart and try to throw and catch the ball five times in a row. Every time they make five successful catches in a row, they get to take a step back. If the ball hits the ground, they must return to their original position and start over.
5. Overhand Bowling and Block: One partner is the bowler and one partner is the blocker. The bowler has three overhand throws to knock down the pins or wicket and the blocker tries to block the ball with a flat bat.
6. Run the Wickets: One Partner is the time keeper and the other partner is going to try to touch as many cones or wickets in 10 seconds. Switch positions after every run.
Check for Understanding:
How is a hitting in cricket different or alike from hitting in baseball?
Explain why it was important to cooperate with your partner.


3-5: Cricket Lesson #1
Previously Taught Skills:
Throwing, Catching, Striking
Equipment:
Pins, Wickets, or two Cones with Lummi stick across the top
Whiffle balls, Low cones, and Hula Hoops
Flat bats or Cricket bat
Warm Up: One Partner is the time keeper and the other partner is going to try to touch as many cones or wickets in 10 seconds. Switch positions after every run.
Skill Practice: Cricket Bowling Practice
Students will show correct form when using an overhand throw to hit the wicket. Explain to students that this overhand motion is called bowling in Cricket. The drill will have three positions (starting line, bowler, and wicket-keeper). The first person at the starting line runs up to the bowling position throws the ball then replaces the wicket-keeper. The wicket-keeper picks up ball, sets up wicket, and gives ball to the next bowler then returns to the starting line. Students rotate through the three positions until time is called. Stress to students that the faster they rotate, the more opportunities they will have to hit wicket. Monitor students to insure they are using the correct overhand throwing mechanics.
Skill Practice: Cricket Hitting Practice
Split the class into groups of three. The positions are fielder, wicket-keeper, and batsman. The batsman will place a ball on a low cone and using an underhand swing, strike the ball. The fielder will run and retrieve the ball then throw it to the wicket-keeper who is standing behind the batsman in a hula hoop (safety zone). The batsman will have three swings before the positions rotate. After three swings, the fielder rotates to the batting position, The batsman rotates to the wicket-keeper position, and the wicket-keeper rotates to the fielding position. Students rotated through the three positions until time is called. Monitor students to insure they are using correct fielding and striking mechanics.
Check for Understanding:
Describe different activities to improve your striking and throwing skills.
Explain the correct striking and throwing motion.

3-5: Cricket Lesson #2
Previously Taught Skills:
Bowling, Hitting, and Fielding
Equipment:
Pins, Wickets, or two Cones with Lummi stick across the top
Whiffle balls and low cones
Flat bats or Cricket bat
Warm Up: Students quickly find two partners, a ball, and a bat and begin playing keep away. The student who is in the middle has a bat and the other two students and going to try to roll or bounce the ball to each other. The student with the bat is not trying to hit the ball but block it like a batsman would when they are trying to protect the wicket or a hockey goalie. Rotate students every few minutes until all students have had a chance to be the batsman. Monitor students to insure they are using correct blocking, throwing, and catching mechanics.
Skill Practice: 5-Player Cricket Hit and Run
Split students into groups of five. The five positions are left field, right field, pitcher, batsman, and wicket-keeper. The batsman hits ball off low cone and runs to see how many wickets or cones they can touch before the fielders can throw the ball into the wicket-keeper. Every fielder including the pitcher must touch the ball before it is thrown to the wicket- keeper. Once the wicket-keeper catches the ball, the batsman must stop running. After each play, the students rotate positions. Once this game is introduced, you can modify it by allowing the pitcher to pitch and instead of throwing it to the catcher; the fielders must knock down the wicket to stop the batter from running. Monitor students to insure they are using correct fielding and striking mechanics.
Modified Game: 8-Player Modified Game
Same game as above but now split students into teams of four. Match two teams of four against each other in a game of cricket. Students who are not batting spread out and umpire the match so the students are responsible for refereeing their own game. Monitor students to insure they are using correct fielding and striking mechanics.
Check for Understanding: Indentify the rules needed to umpire a game of Cricket.
Judge why Baseball became more popular than Cricket in the United States.
List the character traits that umpires must display for a fair game.


6-8: Cricket Lesson #1
Previously Taught Skills:
Baseball and Bowling Skills
Equipment:
Pins, Wickets, or two Cones with Lummi stick across the top
Whiffle balls and low cones
Flat bats or Cricket bat
Warm Up: One Partner is the time keeper and the other partner is going to try to touch as many cones or wickets in 10 seconds. Switch positions after every run.
Skill Practice: Cricket Hitting Practice
Split the class into groups of four. The four positions are fielder, pitcher, batsman, and wicket-keeper. The pitcher will use an overhand throw towards the pins or wicket and the ball must bounce. The batsman will use an underhand swing to strike the ball or use a block to protect the pins or wicket. The fielder will run and retrieve the ball when it is hit and then throw it to the wicket-keeper who is standing behind the batter in a hula hoop (safety zone). The batsman will have three swings before the positions rotate. After three swings, the fielder rotates to the pitching position, the pitcher rotates to the batting position, the batsman rotates to the wicket-keeper position, and the wicket-keeper rotates to the fielding position. Students rotated through the four positions until time is called. Monitor students to insure they are using correct fielding and striking mechanics.
Modified Game: 6-Player Cricket Hit and Run
Split students into groups of five. The five positions are left field, right field, pitch, batsman, wicket-keeper, and umpire. The batsman hits ball off low cone and runs to see how many wickets or cones they can touch before the fielders must knock down the wicket to stop the batter from running. Every fielder including the pitcher must touch the ball before it is thrown at the wicket. Once the wicket is knocked down, the batsman must stop running. After each play, the students rotate the same way as the cricket hitting practice drill except the wicket-keeper is the next umpire. The umpire monitors the match so the students are responsible for refereeing their own game.Monitor students to insure they are using correct fielding and striking mechanics.
Check for Understanding:
Describe the difference in mechanics between a Baseball pitch and Cricket pitch.
Debate why baseball became more popular than Cricket in the United States.

6-8: Cricket Lesson #2
Previously Taught Skills:
Cricket Batting, Fielding, and Bowling Skills
Equipment:
Pins, Wickets, or two Cones with Lummi stick across the top
Whiffle balls and low cones
Flat bats or Cricket bat
Warm Up: Students quickly find two partners, a ball, and a bat and begin playing keep away. The student who is in the middle has a bat and the other two students and going to try to roll or bounce the ball to each other. The student with the bat is not trying to hit the ball but block it like a batsman would when they are trying to protect the wicket. Rotate students every few minutes until all students have had a chance to be the batter. Monitor students to insure they are using correct blocking, throwing, and catching mechanics.
Modified Game: Split students into teams of six and match two teams against each other in a game of cricket. Students who are not batting spread out and umpire the match so the students are responsible for refereeing their own game. Monitor students to insure they are using correct fielding and striking mechanics. After ten minutes of play, rotate teams so they have the opportunity to play other teams.
Check for Understanding:
List the character traits that umpires must display for a fair game.
List ways to play or practice cricket outside of a school setting.


K-5 Recess Lesson Plan
Previously Taught Skills:
Cricket history lesson
Cooperation Activities
Equipment:
USYCA Cricket Sets
Cricket Keep Away: Split your class into groups of three. The student who is in the middle has a bat and the other two students and going to try to roll or bounce the ball to each other. The student with the bat is not trying to hit the ball but block it like a Cricket player would when they are trying to protect the wicket or a hockey goalie. Rotate students every few minutes until all students have had a chance to be the batter.
Dizzy Cricket Bat Race: Split you class into four groups and line them up in front of a wicket. The first student puts their forehead on the end of the cricket bat and spins ten times. After spinning, the student throws a ball at the wicket. The student who threw retrieves the ball and sets the wicket back up for the next student. Continue until each student has multiple turns.
Catch a Fly and You’re Up:In groups of no more than 5, one student will strike at the ball on the batting tee (option to self toss and hit), the fielders must catch one fly ball or three “grounders” in order to have a turn at bat. Students are encouraged to “help out” those students who are trying to get a turn at bat but fall short.
Modified Cricket Match: Split your students into four teams and match teams against each other in a game of cricket. Students who are not batting spread out and umpire the match so the students are responsible for refereeing their own game. Monitor students to insure they are using correct fielding and striking mechanics. After fifteen minutes of play, switch teams so they have the opportunity to play other teams.


Integration


Although the invention of cricket has been lost over time, historians believe that it was probably invented by children during the Saxon and Norman times in south-east England. It is believed that children play this game in England for centuries before adults began to organize teams during the 17th century. Many historians believe the name cricket derived from the old English work cricc or cryce which means a crutch or staff. During the 18th century, the game of cricket became the national sport of England. As the British Empire spread across the globe, the game of cricket was introduced to India, South America, Australia, and other countries. In the United States, cricket was played up until the Civil War when baseball began to become more popular. It is recorded that George Washington played a game of cricket. Today, cricket is one of the most popular sports around the world.

The British Empire



Classroom Project: Research which countries were a part of the British Empire during the 1800’s. Find those countries on the map and label them.



Identify which of these British Colonies still play cricket today.

List the reasons why you believe these countries still participate in cricket today.

Judge why the United States (a former English colony) decided to have baseball as its national pastime instead of cricket?


Cricket Rubric

OUTCOME
LEVEL 4
LEVEL 3
LEVEL 2
LEVEL 1
Batting
Consistently
¨Strikes a moving ball
¨Uses opposition and weight transfer
¨Hits balls towards open space
Usually
¨Strikes a moving ball
¨Uses opposition and weight transfer
¨Hits balls towards open space
Sometimes
¨Strikes a moving ball
¨Uses opposition and weight transfer
¨Hits balls towards open space
Rarely
¨Strikes a moving ball
¨Uses opposition and weight transfer
¨Hits balls towards open space
Bowling and Fielding
Consistently
¨Controlled overhand bowl
¨A bowled ball bounces towards the wicket
¨Catch hit balls
Usually
¨Controlled overhand bowl
¨A bowled ball bounces towards the wicket
¨Catch hit balls
Sometimes
¨Controlled overhand bowl
¨A bowled ball bounces towards the wicket
¨Catch hit balls
Rarely
¨Controlled overhand bowl
¨A bowled ball bounces towards the wicket
¨Catch hit balls
Personal/Social Responsibility
Consistently
¨ Works cooperatively with others in small groups
¨ Respects umpires decisions
Usually
¨ Works cooperatively with others in small groups
¨ Respects umpires decisions
Sometimes
¨ Works cooperatively with others in small groups
¨ Respects umpires decisions
Rarely
¨ Works cooperatively with others in small groups
¨ Respects umpires decisions

Vocabulary


Block: A defensive shot

Bowler: The player on the fielding side who bowls to the batsman.

Bowling: The act of delivering the cricket ball to the batsman.

Cricket ball: A hard, solid ball of cork, wound string and polished leather, with a wide raised equatorial seam.

Fielder: A player on the fielding side who is neither the bowler nor the wicket-keeper, in particular one who has just fielded the ball.

Glove: Part of a batsman's kit worn to protect the hands from accidental injury.

Innings: One player's or one team's turn to bat (or bowl). Unlike in baseball, and perhaps somewhat confusingly, in cricket the term "innings" is both singular and plural.

Outfield: The part of the field lying outside the 30 yard (27 m) circle measured from the centre of the pitch or, less formally, the part of the pitch furthest from the wickets.

Pitch: To bounce the ball before reaching the batsman after delivery.

Single: A run scored by the batsmen physically running once only between the wickets.

Shot: The act of the batsman hitting the ball with his bat.

Stump: One of the three vertical posts making up the wicket. ("off stump", "middle stump" and "leg stump")
Umpire: Enforcers of the rules of play.

Wicket: A set of stumps and bails.

Wicket-keeper: The player on the fielding side who stands immediately behind the batting end wicket.
North Carolina Teacher Evaluation


1a. Teachers lead in their classrooms. Teachers demonstrate leadership by taking responsibility for the progress of all students to ensure that they graduate from high school, are globally competitive for work and postsecondary education, and are prepared for life in the 21st century. Teachers communicate this vision to their students. Using a variety of data sources, they organize, plan, and set goals that meet the needs of the individual student and the class. Teachers use various types of assessment data during the school year to evaluate student progress and to make adjustments to the teaching and learning process. They establish a safe, orderly environment, and create a culture that empowers students to collaborate and become lifelong learners.
  • Cricket rubric, vocabulary, and design your own assessment

2b. Teachers embrace diversity in the school community and in the world. Teachers demonstrate their knowledge of the history of diverse cultures and their role in shaping global issues. They actively select materials and develop lessons that counteract stereotypes and incorporate histories and contributions of all cultures. Teachers recognize the influence of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and other aspects of culture on a student’s development and personality. Teachers strive to understand how a student’s culture and background may influence his or her school performance. Teachers consider and incorporate different points of view in their instruction.
  • Cricket Integration Lesson
  • Discussion about the different cultures that play cricket


2e. Teachers work collaboratively with the families and significant adults in the lives of their students. Teachers recognize that educating children is a shared responsibility involving the school, parents or guardians, and the community. Teachers improve communication and collaboration between the school and the home and community in order to promote trust and understanding and build partnerships with all segments of the school community. Teachers seek solutions to overcome cultural and economic obstacles that may stand in the way of effective family and community involvement in the education of their students.
  • Partnership with the United States Youth Cricket Association (USYCA)
  • Discuss ways for your students to play cricket outside of the school setting regardless of cultural and economic obstacles


3a. Teachers align their instruction with the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. In order to enhance the North Carolina Standard Course of Study, teachers investigate the content standards developed by professional organizations in their specialty area. They develop and apply strategies to make the curriculum rigorous and relevant for all students and provide a balanced curriculum that enhances literacy skills. Elementary teachers have explicit and thorough preparation in literacy instruction. Middle and high school teachers incorporate literacy instruction within the content area or discipline.
  • See the North Carolina Healthy Living Essential Standards section

3c. Teachers recognize the interconnectedness of content areas/disciplines. Teachers know the links and vertical alignment of the grade or subject they teach and the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. Teachers understand how the content they teach relates to other disciplines in order to deepen understanding and connect learning for students. Teachers promote global awareness and its relevance to subjects they teach.
  • Cricket Integration Lesson


3d. Teachers make instruction relevant to students. Teachers incorporate 21st century life skills into their teaching deliberately, strategically, and broadly. These skills include leadership, ethics, accountability, adaptability, personal productivity, personal responsibility, people skills, self-direction, and social responsibility. Teachers help their students understand the relationship between the North Carolina Standard Course of Study and 21st century content, which includes global awareness; financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy; civic literacy; and health awareness.
  • Use of umpires and small group games to teach leadership, ethics, accountability, adaptability, personal productivity, personal responsibility, people skills, self-direction, and social responsibility.


4b. Teachers plan instruction appropriate for their students. Teachers collaborate with their colleagues and use a variety of data sources for short- and long-range planning based on the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. These plans reflect an understanding of how students learn. Teachers engage students in the learning process. They understand that instructional plans must be consistently monitored and modified to enhance learning. Teachers make the curriculum responsive to cultural differences and individual learning needs.
  • Modifying these lesson to meet your students needs
  • Modifying these lesson to meet your school setting and equipment

4f. Teachers help students work in teams and develop leadership qualities. Teachers teach the importance of cooperation and collaboration. They organize learning teams in order to help students define roles, strengthen social ties, improve communication and collaborative skills, interact with people from different cultures and backgrounds, and develop leadership qualities.
  • Use of umpires and small group games to teach cooperation and collaboration
  • Use of umpires and small group games to help students define roles, strengthen social ties, improve communication and collaborative skills, interact with people from different cultures and backgrounds, and develop leadership qualities

4h. Teachers use a variety of methods to assess what each student has learned. Teachers use multiple indicators, including formative and summative assessments, to evaluate student progress and growth as they strive to eliminate achievement gaps. Teachers provide opportunities, methods, feedback, and tools for students to assess themselves and each other. Teachers use 21st century assessment systems to inform instruction and demonstrate evidence of students’ 21st century knowledge, skills, performance, and dispositions.
  • Cricket rubric, vocabulary, and design your own assessment

5b. Teachers link professional growth to their professional goals. Teachers participate in continued, high-quality professional development that reflects a global view of educational practices; includes 21st century skills and knowledge; aligns with the State Board of Education priorities; and meets the needs of students and their own professional growth.
  • 2011-2012 Physical Education professional development that included cricket presentation

Skill Videos
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfJYhuhZvMc&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8VJrwcDaeI&feature=BFa&list=ULjk_fJrfRsGQ&index=8http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FdsA251hs&feature=autoplay&list=ULjk_fJrfRsGQ&index=19&playnext=1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2KYSDHEGZk&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Anw6E8mLi9E&feature=relatedhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QK6OARK8DVw&feature=related
_
Press Releases
http://www.cms.k12.nc.us/News/Pages/CricketcomestoCMS.aspx
http://charlotte.news14.com/content/school_news/644961/cricket-coming-to-cms-elementary-and-middle-schools

Designed by Charlotte Mecklenburg Physical Education teachers:
Brandon Nels
Donna Badami
Doug Smith